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redo

ved in St. Louis to stay on the Olive block of 2100. I found no work but my mother found work cleaning houses. So nothin' too hard on her but I think this got to her. She had to walk to work everyday. She worked for some big business owners. Too bad I was not. Always wanted to be since then. Closest I got was this busboys. I washed the glasses and poured the liquor, sometimes found a woman singing to the garden of my mind. Just daisies all a bloom while I chewed on my orange rind. You wouldn't forget till you had to ask her.
As a matter of fact, I met a girl whose name was Daisy and this story is told from her perspective. My life became all about her. I made her a Daisy Waters three months later we moved into an apartment building on Delmar owned by a landlady named Mrs. Robinson. More women bosses up here than in the south, but somehow Daisy made everything sweet about that orange rind. She soon quit singing at the Club Fish. I didn't want her there. “Alright Kipster,” she said.
My life as I can Recall for the new Daisy Waters:
I was born in Aberdeen, Mississippi on the 11th day of May, 1915. My mother told me my Uncle Tom said it was way out in the woods. What he called the Byo. They lived on a farm where she cooked for a Captain Henry. There we lived until we were about three years old. I can remember one day a very bad storm came and so goes the story. We moved up to St. Louis, Missouri because it destroyed my home. Now, we're gonna go back and build one. Should have known the storm would have come back. Now, the storm killed my husband Kipster, but I still feel like his soul is with me. The orange rinds keep me going. I chew and I remember just deal with it. Bitterness tastes better, listening to him. “He sees you sometimes, girl,” said his Mama on the phone. He ain't gone.



















A Poem for the end of CHEW THE they want to lick the tight
they cannot see why it's fRight
given?
give in, do whatever gives us
it's what we want for thick
give us this
now who cares?
rings, of sex-gender
then, them, let
get, see all
pull it!
OUR SHOES ARE GREAT!
TING, TING THE TOES GO IN,
BANDS ARE PLAYIN',
THOSE HEELS ARE PAININ',
WHAT? HEELS FOR MEN YOU MIGHT?
OH HECK THE WHITE IS LIGHT,
I CAN'T BELIEVE WHAT THE HAIR IT IS,
THEY JUST DON'T LIKE US TO PRETEND THIS,
WELL SHOES: NEWS,
IT TELLS A STORY
WHAT'S YOURS?
OURS IS HISTORY
Publish rubbish?
Ask me easy.
a sneeze at the formality
a wrong right
a question in might
What are they going to want?
That's All They Is Goin' To Want.
Feeling unwrapped in your vows,
undoing every letter,
it will seem to float every rush,
never go out and away from attachment,
seeing how we're bent into shapes,
of circles and squares, diamonds compressed,
let's mesh, let's marry these vows,
how? you ask?
just deliver some food,
straight from the cows

Feeling unwrapped in your vows,
undoing every letter,
it will seem to float every rush,
never go out and away from attachment,
seeing how we're bent into shapes,
of circles and squares, diamonds compressed,
let's mesh, let's marry these vows,
how? you ask?
just deliver some food,
straight from the cows
Let them enter the site
they want to lick the tight
they cannot see why it's fRight
given?
give in, do whatever gives us
it's what we want for thick
give us this
now who cares?
rings, of sex-gender
then, them, let
get, see all
pull it!
They hate to keep telling you,
they hate to keep being here,
they hate what they are,
they hate why they're here,
they hate anything about you,
they hate why,
Now, that they have said that,
CAre! Just care! Please Care!
It's all they want!
please put the haunt of life behind you,
look in front,
look out there,
there's flowers of red,
the're dying from living,
Live, cAre, die, so there,
It's easy as squeezing an orange,
as a bright, brisk sunny day walk,
as a dog's lick,
as a stomp on the ground,
jump up and down,
let out a loud woman hoorah!
We are not blah, dear friend!
Dear friend, we are all we are!
We are beautiful!
meant to be cool,
honestly, never care,
love is there,
the devil is in the details,
but the clouds are in the sky,
look up, make things on the by and by,
why?
Just do,
That's it,
We are just sorry,
to all that we have to worry,
says anything bad in your heart,
please keep yours like a dart,
piercing through the air, sharp,
and with care, stabbing the board,
Forward, with care!
Harsh! harsh! harsh!
I see perfect! Beautiful! Care!
Trust me, this is what you are, dear friend!
What's up! Actually!
Goodbye,
Hello to caring,
What's up! Gosh! We just don't care!
nice philosophy to bear!
We really will never stop doin' it for 'em
It's all we wanna say we are
we don't care less anywhere else
we will be for 'em
Jus' for 'em
Shake it down, rub the scrub
We don't care there
we have here
let's hide until they don't dare
we will copy until we mend
bridges! bridges! bridges!
but all round abound
air, for hair our guts
are in Italy for ourselves
It is not here
It is here
We went up there
so there
There are so many of us
so there
There's nothing you can do
so there
Is it so partner?
so there
where's the care
just care
cannot do so
we are just soul
Picky, prickly roses fall upon your hardness
I long for short, long hair upon your grease
black nights, white days, upon my shadow
of my riches in glory
I cannot seem to fight the end of this story
My might, my strength is footed well upon your climb
I rebut any negative
I reboot any plush pillows of settling upon your year
This will be forever pictured, lips puff like the pillows
It's what I settle upon, The spit, the slime of understanding love
It can never be gross
It is as sterling as silver
as gold as sterling
silver and gold
bold
Behold a stomach of pleasure
muscles of bumps, never a rough
but a tough
and rubber
we will flounder
children will blunder
It is asunder
our thunder
Silver and gold
Sterling to say the least
sterling silver
unleashes the beast of old
gold, new gold, find it
to hold
I'm hungry, I'm hungry
what can I do when I'm hungry?
What do you need?
Let's go out there and see if there's som'm
C'mon let's go back in
I'll sit at the front of the table, Sue
It can't be,
I don't see you
C'mon baby,
be sweet
I cannot see you,
thank you, 'ew
I can eat the sticks
I can eat the sausage
Who's gonna sit there?
I don't know
well you sit there
I'll just go
Do you toast them in the toaster?
He left mama
O'l angry man, you sit in the front, man
why mama?
Where's the syrup Dan?
Just do it, he's gon' back to 'Bama
Running in the wild,
being every child.
Going the distance,
hearing you with us.
Never needing a thing,
a big study, a ring.
Soul that will lie,
body that is shy.
Gibberish that will fish,
everyone's Christmas wish.
Some cake is baking in the
checkered brownie,
it is warm to the nostril
inflated fat noses smell, kindly.
The strong scents
of a party done well.
Haughtily, haughtily, haughtily.
Diamonds glisten in the moonlight shine
I adore the fire of jade inclined
to give me another golden pearl
of starry silvery messages
rubies of knowledge
the jewel of the day soon ran upon us
that is what life really dazzles
the sun the jewel of day
I could never razzle
It is a jewel day
Diamonds glisten in the moonlight shine
I adore the fire of jade inclined
to give me another golden pearl
of starry silvery messages
rubies of knowledge
the jewel of the day soon ran upon us
that is what life really dazzles
the sun the the jewel of day
I could never razzle
It is a jewel day
"I love Grits!"
Gnarly, grinding explosions of sugar
popping on the eye
the stove turns red,
clumping into one big glob
to moisten into gooey, chewy, stretchy
sides to something like bacon or maybe sausage
but all white
sugar is added to sweetness, butter to basics;
ah, yes grits!
a staple of grain
"Hooray, hooray!"
Little Timmy said all in vain
"I want some again and again!"
"You can have some more,
Timmy, friend a Grit!"
Timmy's mom said.
"Together, they are good!
bit by bit!
Licking, sapping the doctor is in
Singing, barking
Giving orders to sit
She wonders when the band-aid won't rip
From the grip of her teeth
She knows how to salve
The doctor is in
to resolve.
2Sweet, the puppy friend of
Paw Prints Express
Just here to mend our hearts of distress.
Petals a poses
Come on to the roses
unfortune of noses
Achoo!
to the riches!
Achoo!
to the drenches!
Achoo!
to the pollen
Once my nose is swollen
Tissue from boxes
hexes and foxes
the deal of decks
care of hecks
all are the feel
of something but
it must be huts
c'mon Joe Real
c'mon Joe Real
Adieu!
It came thrashing
It came pushing
rattles and tales of defecation
and celebration
brown babies about
running amuck with thought
seriously exiting the womb
brown and woven with dragon fly wings
the sac breaks through as the feces fall
Both born into the world at the same time
as it becomes a baby to give
why give them away?
The Ghost in the poetry is: Hi My name is
Michelle.








CHEW THE ORANGE RIND
“Do you want some orange juice?” “Baby.” “Hello, my name is Kipster.” “I have a big arm.” “I'm from here.” “I lived down the street.” “The storm broke up the window in the big house.” “I died on the 13th day of October, 1939.” I was born on my fancy couch as my parents were known expensive storm chasers. They could warn any shouting woman that a tornado would touch before she could screech it down to the odd balls. “Hey, it's weird someone would listen to a homemade storm chaser, but it's past-time for many to read my parent's column.” It publishes in The Zesty everyday at about 10 p.m. “We read it ourselves just to spectate and tell it to their dogs.” Who are we? We are our dead girlfriend and me. We rome the earth in our afterlife. I'm just telling her about my life, as it were, as it is for my family and friends. She's very entertained.
Their dogs names are Sunny and Bright. Not two names you would expect from storm chasers, but I think it helped them get away from it all. My mother is a tall lanky woman with a chicken neck. She wears square glasses, is about the complexion of wet sand as you step on it. She likes to wear expensive earings and drab red lipstick everyday that begins to melt into her complexion. Short hair swept down the middle. It looks like two heaves separated by one man-made part. “Ready for work, she meets my father-to-be.” Married twice, got to know who is my daddy is real bad. She wouldn't let me get to know this one, so I won't describe him much. He just tags along and I'll describe him. He's a real frontman. She had three socks, tried on all three of ‘em to tell her tots their just like men. You gotta keep trying till one stays on. Back in those days of 1902, socks didn't have elastic so you really had to see them on first. By the way my last name to count was Christie. So my name is Kipster Christie, thank you. My mother Mrs. Christie, the only name she'll go by. He just likes to tell her that he loves her. He goes by the name Johnnie Christie. We all live on 2763 Three Mile Road. It was named that because we always land three miles away from home whenever there's a storm if we don't run from shelter. Montgomery, Alabamad has storms a mile long in time. Papa said. Well New Papa, as we will call him, face would droop down from the tiredness of these storms. New papa don't know what to do about such. He crawled back with a splinter in his bottom cheek. It was a day. The children were lost, but a lot was found…courage, love, strength, admiration, and a sense for chewing the orange rind. It's something new papa said made him strong in the winter time and healthy in the summer. He died one year later. The doctor in Montgomery said it was some kind of infection from the splinter. Well, the summer went and the winter was just a bit too much of a bother. My mother, my brother, and me moved out of Montgomery, Alabama to Aberdeen, Mississippi. It was a long journey. Well we made a lot of relatives along the way. Hard to explain but here it goes.
First stop off on the way at the time was Stills, Alabama. We met a tone of complete love. It was love to the left, love to the right, up north, and down south of Still, it felt. I couldn't imagine a better truck to bring. It was fancy. It was red. Red fancy pulled all the knee kickers in our house. They built many trucks in stills, Alabama. Just pick up abandoned trucks off the side of the road and fixed them. It was a past-time back then. Eventually, the owners just didn't want the vehicles and donated them to the Stills Auto Shop. They did such a good job with them they made it car city capital of Alabama to our relatives. So that's what I'll call Stills, Alabama. Keep up with the language now. Two cousins, five aunts, and four uncles on both sides of the family there. They were known as the more lively uncles we had. Uncle Teetles had a puffy pony tail that went on for days. We couldn't even stand not to call him a full steed. He looked like a horse's tail was smashed onto his head. He looked funny without it pulled back and properly fastened. Otherwise it puffed in his cow's faces. They couldn't stand the hair. He put too much grease in it for the cows. They would get fussy. They won't milk good with hair in the eye. He was 35, last I saw him. Me, I'm 20 and my widowed mother was 37 last I saw her. Well, I was 20. We stayed at the farm.
How can anyone make relatives? Well, in that small town that's what we call making friends. Everyone's family. Everyone is caring. We all must hear what the cow's moo every morning. It's our way of describing the gossip. “Let's hear the gossip,” said the girl happily. We have to read TWO DRINKS. “What's that?” said the girl. By the way, my name is Henrietta. There's usually one in the truck. Let's go over there. Yup there's one in the glove compartment. Here it is. The cow's moo is that Jerry wore some white pants to mow the lawn in and Aunt Clease ate a raw radish out of Mr. Cornwelk's farm. He was the only white farmer in the town to squat for a while. He didn't stay for long. A mobile transit he owned. Could stay and just pack up. No one knows who owned the land,so we just played on it until the tree grew over it. I used to swing my feet over it. Felt like stealing at the time, but no one knew where they went, him and his wife. Now, why get into race then? Well, it's no secret wealth was what our family had plenty of, according to our small towns. Big city fools probably would sort through it in a day. Well, piece of candy only cost a nickel. Where we were staying the property was willed, so plenty of money was saved from milking those cows. My mama was interested in storm chasing there, but there weren't many. She took to fashioning dresses for the townsfolks. The only day of rest, of course, is Sunday church mornings. It was a show indeed. I could describe the whole town to you just by the church day of rest. Well, Ms. Cresty sat in her cropped top flower dress mama made with always a little too heaving at the top ends. Not appropriate for any southerner not to wear their hat with such a dress. Mama made that one and sold it for 5 dollars. We were saving for a 2000 dollar barn to sew in and I just helped clean house and cook the chickens she'd kill. She'd just take them by the neck and turn them in a circle, smack them down on a tree stump. Then, we had dinner. We had chicken just about everyday, real feast. Thankful to our Lord, we'd often sleep outside to feel how safe and lovely it was there. What is there and here? Do you ask? Well, actually, before I have stayed in the beautiful state of New York for about a month. My cousin drove our truck up there and was smashed three days later because he ran into a tree. We called him Mandero. He saw someone coming and had to go left and wham ran right into the tree. The other driver has not been seen. Too fast of a life there, can't keep up with the driving or no care for all the duties to help me go on. I felt cold, so went back to sweet home. I can't see when I'd be there again. We settled here. We are cow mooing with the best of ‘em and we won't turn back.
A lot of people were uprooted back then. WE were lucky for our family. Some were just homeless. Well, we were the Christies no more. Now, we'd gone back to my mother's mama's name, she didn't have no daddy, this was of Waters. These are our slave names, you ask? NO. we started with a new name from them. Our name changed. We no longer felt owned that way. We were of the Waters of that town now. Kipster Waters, at your service my dear.
I told the new girl down in town. Designed for hearing yes, I was surprised to hear I was not on her list of references. She wanted to insert that she was of royalty. I could not imagine all of that in this little small town. Boy, they sure done us good. God is love, here. I chewed on my orange rind. That‘s the one thing that never changes is how I was taught to do this to deal with life's challenges. Her saying no was puzzling to me. I chewed on that orange rind. And stared at my uncle's hair. Boy what's wrong with you, he said. What you chewin'? I said the orange rind jus' something my third papa done tought me to chew when things ain't great. Is that so? Give me a piece, “yuck this is bitter,” he said. “Yeah it takes something to chew it,” I said. “I can help you not chew it, he said. “Want to get married?” “Well, you got it, Kipster.” “Well, let's see the girl tomorrow,” he said promisingly. “We'll just wait for her to walk down that same dusty street,” he uttered. “? “Is that settled?” “Settled.” Everything will be so lovely, here. “My mama found a brand new main squeeze,” I told him. In her short green dress and black jacket, that girl he promised walked down the dusty road in her strappy black sandals. “Hey ma'm,” said my uncle. “My nephew has a crush on you, but you just drove-off.” “Hiya ma'm my nephew thinks he just wants to help you down.” “Come off that pedestal you on!” “Where you from?” “We don't do that stuff here.” “Be kind to him, speak in this time you hear!” “Speak up girl!” “Well,” she said. “I speak atop a hill and preach.” “I'm the new preacher.” His jaw dropped. No one ever heard of a girl preacher before. We ran back to look at the cow moo's and there it was Preacher Mann was dead. We had a female. My mama wouldn't hear of it. Said she'd be low every month. We packed and left the next day heading to St. Louis. We had a friend there or family, whatever you wanna call it. We'll just stay there. A big city. “I'll be talking to strangers there”, I thought. After seeing how that went they didn't want to cozy up to small town affairs. In St. Louis we'll keep to ourselves. You'll see man duties.
“This will be better.” “Old fashioned I'm to this society,” I said. It took about three days but we arrived in St. Louis to stay on the Olive block of 2100. I found no work but my mother found work cleaning houses. So nothin' too hard on her but I think this got to her. She had to walk to work everyday. She worked for some big business owners. Too bad I was not. Always wanted to be since then. Closest I got was this busboys. I washed the glasses and poured the liquor, sometimes found a woman singing to the garden of my mind. Just daisies all a bloom while I chewed on my orange rind. You wouldn't forget till you had to ask her.
As a matter of fact, I met a girl whose name was Daisy and this story is told from her perspective. My life became all about her. I made her a Daisy Waters three months later we moved into an apartment building on Delmar owned by a landlady named Mrs. Robinson. More women bosses up here than in the south, but somehow Daisy made everything sweet about that orange rind. She soon quit singing at the Club Fish. I didn't want her there. “Alright Kipster,” she said.
My life as I can Recall for the new Daisy Waters:
I was born in Aberdeen, Mississippi on the 11th day of May, 1915. My mother told me my Uncle Tom said it was way out in the woods. What he called the Byo. They lived on a farm where she cooked for a Captain Henry. There we lived until we were about three years old. I can remember one day a very bad storm came and so goes the story. We moved up to St. Louis, Missouri because it destroyed my home. Now, we're gonna go back and build one. Should have known the storm would have come back. Now, the storm killed my husband Kipster, but I still feel like his soul is with me. The orange rinds keep me going. I chew and I remember just deal with it. Bitterness tastes better, listening to him. “He sees you sometimes, girl,” said his Mama on the phone. He ain't gone.



















A Poem for the end of CHEW THE ORANGE RIND:

LIFE AFTER DEATH: A SPEECH BY THE MAIN CHARACTER:

Diamonds glisten in the moonlight shine
I adore the fire of jade inclined
to give me another golden pearl
of starry silvery messages
rubies of knowledge
the jewel of the day soon ran upon us
that is what life really dazzles
the sun the jewel of day
I could never razzle
It is a jewel day
Let them enter the site
they want to lick the tight
they cannot see why it's fRight
given?
give in, do whatever gives us
it's what we want for thick
give us this
now who cares?
rings, of sex-gender
then, them, let
get, see all
pull it!
OUR SHOES ARE GREAT!
TING, TING THE TOES GO IN,
BANDS ARE PLAYIN',
THOSE HEELS ARE PAININ',
WHAT? HEELS FOR MEN YOU MIGHT?
OH HECK THE WHITE IS LIGHT,
I CAN'T BELIEVE WHAT THE HAIR IT IS,
THEY JUST DON'T LIKE US TO PRETEND THIS,
WELL SHOES: NEWS,
IT TELLS A STORY
WHAT'S YOURS?
OURS IS HISTORY
Publish rubbish?
Ask me easy.
a sneeze at the formality
a wrong right
a question in might
What are they going to want?
That's All They Is Goin' To Want.
Feeling unwrapped in your vows,
undoing every letter,
it will seem to float every rush,
never go out and away from attachment,
seeing how we're bent into shapes,
of circles and squares, diamonds compressed,
let's mesh, let's marry these vows,
how? you ask?
just deliver some food,
straight from the cows

Feeling unwrapped in your vows,
undoing every letter,
it will seem to float every rush,
never go out and away from attachment,
seeing how we're bent into shapes,
of circles and squares, diamonds compressed,
let's mesh, let's marry these vows,
how? you ask?
just deliver some food,
straight from the cows
Let them enter the site
they want to lick the tight
they cannot see why it's fRight
given?
give in, do whatever gives us
it's what we want for thick
give us this
now who cares?
rings, of sex-gender
then, them, let
get, see all
pull it!
They hate to keep telling you,
they hate to keep being here,
they hate what they are,
they hate why they're here,
they hate anything about you,
they hate why,
Now, that they have said that,
CAre! Just care! Please Care!
It's all they want!
please put the haunt of life behind you,
look in front,
look out there,
there's flowers of red,
the're dying from living,
Live, cAre, die, so there,
It's easy as squeezing an orange,
as a bright, brisk sunny day walk,
as a dog's lick,
as a stomp on the ground,
jump up and down,
let out a loud woman hoorah!
We are not blah, dear friend!
Dear friend, we are all we are!
We are beautiful!
meant to be cool,
honestly, never care,
love is there,
the devil is in the details,
but the clouds are in the sky,
look up, make things on the by and by,
why?
Just do,
That's it,
We are just sorry,
to all that we have to worry,
says anything bad in your heart,
please keep yours like a dart,
piercing through the air, sharp,
and with care, stabbing the board,
Forward, with care!
Harsh! harsh! harsh!
I see perfect! Beautiful! Care!
Trust me, this is what you are, dear friend!
What's up! Actually!
Goodbye,
Hello to caring,
What's up! Gosh! We just don't care!
nice philosophy to bear!
We really will never stop doin' it for 'em
It's all we wanna say we are
we don't care less anywhere else
we will be for 'em
Jus' for 'em
Shake it down, rub the scrub
We don't care there
we have here
let's hide until they don't dare
we will copy until we mend
bridges! bridges! bridges!
but all round abound
air, for hair our guts
are in Italy for ourselves
It is not here
It is here
We went up there
so there
There are so many of us
so there
There's nothing you can do
so there
Is it so partner?
so there
where's the care
just care
cannot do so
we are just soul
Picky, prickly roses fall upon your hardness
I long for short, long hair upon your grease
black nights, white days, upon my shadow
of my riches in glory
I cannot seem to fight the end of this story
My might, my strength is footed well upon your climb
I rebut any negative
I reboot any plush pillows of settling upon your year
This will be forever pictured, lips puff like the pillows
It's what I settle upon, The spit, the slime of understanding love
It can never be gross
It is as sterling as silver
as gold as sterling
silver and gold
bold
Behold a stomach of pleasure
muscles of bumps, never a rough
but a tough
and rubber
we will flounder
children will blunder
It is asunder
our thunder
Silver and gold
Sterling to say the least
sterling silver
unleashes the beast of old
gold, new gold, find it
to hold
I'm hungry, I'm hungry
what can I do when I'm hungry?
What do you need?
Let's go out there and see if there's som'm
C'mon let's go back in
I'll sit at the front of the table, Sue
It can't be,
I don't see you
C'mon baby,
be sweet
I cannot see you,
thank you, 'ew
I can eat the sticks
I can eat the sausage
Who's gonna sit there?
I don't know
well you sit there
I'll just go
Do you toast them in the toaster?
He left mama
O'l angry man, you sit in the front, man
why mama?
Where's the syrup Dan?
Just do it, he's gon' back to 'Bama
Running in the wild,
being every child.
Going the distance,
hearing you with us.
Never needing a thing,
a big study, a ring.
Soul that will lie,
body that is shy.
Gibberish that will fish,
everyone's Christmas wish.
Some cake is baking in the
checkered brownie,
it is warm to the nostril
inflated fat noses smell, kindly.
The strong scents
of a party done well.
Haughtily, haughtily, haughtily.
Diamonds glisten in the moonlight shine
I adore the fire of jade inclined
to give me another golden pearl
of starry silvery messages
rubies of knowledge
the jewel of the day soon ran upon us
that is what life really dazzles
the sun the jewel of day
I could never razzle
It is a jewel day
Diamonds glisten in the moonlight shine
I adore the fire of jade inclined
to give me another golden pearl
of starry silvery messages
rubies of knowledge
the jewel of the day soon ran upon us
that is what life really dazzles
the sun the the jewel of day
I could never razzle
It is a jewel day
"I love Grits!"
Gnarly, grinding explosions of sugar
popping on the eye
the stove turns red,
clumping into one big glob
to moisten into gooey, chewy, stretchy
sides to something like bacon or maybe sausage
but all white
sugar is added to sweetness, butter to basics;
ah, yes grits!
a staple of grain
"Hooray, hooray!"
Little Timmy said all in vain
"I want some again and again!"
"You can have some more,
Timmy, friend a Grit!"
Timmy's mom said.
"Together, they are good!
bit by bit!
Licking, sapping the doctor is in
Singing, barking
Giving orders to sit
She wonders when the band-aid won't rip
From the grip of her teeth
She knows how to salve
The doctor is in
to resolve.
2Sweet, the puppy friend of
Paw Prints Express
Just here to mend our hearts of distress.
Petals a poses
Come on to the roses
unfortune of noses
Achoo!
to the riches!
Achoo!
to the drenches!
Achoo!
to the pollen
Once my nose is swollen
Tissue from boxes
hexes and foxes
the deal of decks
care of hecks
all are the feel
of something but
it must be huts
c'mon Joe Real
c'mon Joe Real
Adieu!
It came thrashing
It came pushing
rattles and tales of defecation
and celebration
brown babies about
running amuck with thought
seriously exiting the womb
brown and woven with dragon fly wings
the sac breaks through as the feces fall
Both born into the world at the same time
as it becomes a baby to give
why give them away?
The Ghost in the poetry is: Hi My name is
Michelle.





CHEW THE ORANGE RIND
“Do you want some orange juice?” “Baby.” “Hello, my name is Kipster.” “I have a big arm.” “I'm from here.” “I lived down the street.” “The storm broke up the window in the big house.” “I died on the 13th day of October, 1939.” I was born on my fancy couch as my parents were known expensive storm chasers. They could warn any shouting woman that a tornado would touch before she could screech it down to the odd balls. “Hey, it's weird someone would listen to a homemade storm chaser, but it's past-time for many to read my parent's column.” It publishes in The Zesty everyday at about 10 p.m. “We read it ourselves just to spectate and tell it to their dogs.” Who are we? We are our dead girlfriend and me. We rome the earth in our afterlife. I'm just telling her about my life, as it were, as it is for my family and friends. She's very entertained.
Their dogs names are Sunny and Bright. Not two names you would expect from storm chasers, but I think it helped them get away from it all. My mother is a tall lanky woman with a chicken neck. She wears square glasses, is about the complexion of wet sand as you step on it. She likes to wear expensive earings and drab red lipstick everyday that begins to melt into her complexion. Short hair swept down the middle. It looks like two heaves separated by one man-made part. “Ready for work, she meets my father-to-be.” Married twice, got to know who is my daddy is real bad. She wouldn't let me get to know this one, so I won't describe him much. He just tags along and I'll describe him. He's a real frontman. She had three socks, tried on all three of ‘em to tell her tots their just like men. You gotta keep trying till one stays on. Back in those days of 1902, socks didn't have elastic so you really had to see them on first. By the way my last name to count was Christie. So my name is Kipster Christie, thank you. My mother Mrs. Christie, the only name she'll go by. He just likes to tell her that he loves her. He goes by the name Johnnie Christie. We all live on 2763 Three Mile Road. It was named that because we always land three miles away from home whenever there's a storm if we don't run from shelter. Montgomery, Alabamad has storms a mile long in time. Papa said. Well New Papa, as we will call him, face would droop down from the tiredness of these storms. New papa don't know what to do about such. He crawled back with a splinter in his bottom cheek. It was a day. The children were lost, but a lot was found…courage, love, strength, admiration, and a sense for chewing the orange rind. It's something new papa said made him strong in the winter time and healthy in the summer. He died one year later. The doctor in Montgomery said it was some kind of infection from the splinter. Well, the summer went and the winter was just a bit too much of a bother. My mother, my brother, and me moved out of Montgomery, Alabama to Aberdeen, Mississippi. It was a long journey. Well we made a lot of relatives along the way. Hard to explain but here it goes.
First stop off on the way at the time was Stills, Alabama. We met a tone of complete love. It was love to the left, love to the right, up north, and down south of Still, it felt. I couldn't imagine a better truck to bring. It was fancy. It was red. Red fancy pulled all the knee kickers in our house. They built many trucks in stills, Alabama. Just pick up abandoned trucks off the side of the road and fixed them. It was a past-time back then. Eventually, the owners just didn't want the vehicles and donated them to the Stills Auto Shop. They did such a good job with them they made it car city capital of Alabama to our relatives. So that's what I'll call Stills, Alabama. Keep up with the language now. Two cousins, five aunts, and four uncles on both sides of the family there. They were known as the more lively uncles we had. Uncle Teetles had a puffy pony tail that went on for days. We couldn't even stand not to call him a full steed. He looked like a horse's tail was smashed onto his head. He looked funny without it pulled back and properly fastened. Otherwise it puffed in his cow's faces. They couldn't stand the hair. He put too much grease in it for the cows. They would get fussy. They won't milk good with hair in the eye. He was 35, last I saw him. Me, I'm 20 and my widowed mother was 37 last I saw her. Well, I was 20. We stayed at the farm.
How can anyone make relatives? Well, in that small town that's what we call making friends. Everyone's family. Everyone is caring. We all must hear what the cow's moo every morning. It's our way of describing the gossip. “Let's hear the gossip,” said the girl happily. We have to read TWO DRINKS. “What's that?” said the girl. By the way, my name is Henrietta. There's usually one in the truck. Let's go over there. Yup there's one in the glove compartment. Here it is. The cow's moo is that Jerry wore some white pants to mow the lawn in and Aunt Clease ate a raw radish out of Mr. Cornwelk's farm. He was the only white farmer in the town to squat for a while. He didn't stay for long. A mobile transit he owned. Could stay and just pack up. No one knows who owned the land,so we just played on it until the tree grew over it. I used to swing my feet over it. Felt like stealing at the time, but no one knew where they went, him and his wife. Now, why get into race then? Well, it's no secret wealth was what our family had plenty of, according to our small towns. Big city fools probably would sort through it in a day. Well, piece of candy only cost a nickel. Where we were staying the property was willed, so plenty of money was saved from milking those cows. My mama was interested in storm chasing there, but there weren't many. She took to fashioning dresses for the townsfolks. The only day of rest, of course, is Sunday church mornings. It was a show indeed. I could describe the whole town to you just by the church day of rest. Well, Ms. Cresty sat in her cropped top flower dress mama made with always a little too heaving at the top ends. Not appropriate for any southerner not to wear their hat with such a dress. Mama made that one and sold it for 5 dollars. We were saving for a 2000 dollar barn to sew in and I just helped clean house and cook the chickens she'd kill. She'd just take them by the neck and turn them in a circle, smack them down on a tree stump. Then, we had dinner. We had chicken just about everyday, real feast. Thankful to our Lord, we'd often sleep outside to feel how safe and lovely it was there. What is there and here? Do you ask? Well, actually, before I have stayed in the beautiful state of New York for about a month. My cousin drove our truck up there and was smashed three days later because he ran into a tree. We called him Mandero. He saw someone coming and had to go left and wham ran right into the tree. The other driver has not been seen. Too fast of a life there, can't keep up with the driving or no care for all the duties to help me go on. I felt cold, so went back to sweet home. I can't see when I'd be there again. We settled here. We are cow mooing with the best of ‘em and we won't turn back.
A lot of people were uprooted back then. WE were lucky for our family. Some were just homeless. Well, we were the Christies no more. Now, we'd gone back to my mother's mama's name, she didn't have no daddy, this was of Waters. These are our slave names, you ask? NO. we started with a new name from them. Our name changed. We no longer felt owned that way. We were of the Waters of that town now. Kipster Waters, at your service my dear.
I told the new girl down in town. Designed for hearing yes, I was surprised to hear I was not on her list of references. She wanted to insert that she was of royalty. I could not imagine all of that in this little small town. Boy, they sure done us good. God is love, here. I chewed on my orange rind. That‘s the one thing that never changes is how I was taught to do this to deal with life's challenges. Her saying no was puzzling to me. I chewed on that orange rind. And stared at my uncle's hair. Boy what's wrong with you, he said. What you chewin'? I said the orange rind jus' something my third papa done tought me to chew when things ain't great. Is that so? Give me a piece, “yuck this is bitter,” he said. “Yeah it takes something to chew it,” I said. “I can help you not chew it, he said. “Want to get married?” “Well, you got it, Kipster.” “Well, let's see the girl tomorrow,” he said promisingly. “We'll just wait for her to walk down that same dusty street,” he uttered. “? “Is that settled?” “Settled.” Everything will be so lovely, here. “My mama found a brand new main squeeze,” I told him. In her short green dress and black jacket, that girl he promised walked down the dusty road in her strappy black sandals. “Hey ma'm,” said my uncle. “My nephew has a crush on you, but you just drove-off.” “Hiya ma'm my nephew thinks he just wants to help you down.” “Come off that pedestal you on!” “Where you from?” “We don't do that stuff here.” “Be kind to him, speak in this time you hear!” “Speak up girl!” “Well,” she said. “I speak atop a hill and preach.” “I'm the new preacher.” His jaw dropped. No one ever heard of a girl preacher before. We ran back to look at the cow moo's and there it was Preacher Mann was dead. We had a female. My mama wouldn't hear of it. Said she'd be low every month. We packed and left the next day heading to St. Louis. We had a friend there or family, whatever you wanna call it. We'll just stay there. A big city. “I'll be talking to strangers there”, I thought. After seeing how that went they didn't want to cozy up to small town affairs. In St. Louis we'll keep to ourselves. You'll see man duties.
“This will be better.” “Old fashioned I'm to this society,” I said. It took about three days but we arrived in St. Louis to stay on the Olive block of 2100. I found no work but my mother found work cleaning houses. So nothin' too hard on her but I think this got to her. She had to walk to work everyday. She worked for some big business owners. Too bad I was not. Always wanted to be since then. Closest I got was this busboys. I washed the glasses and poured the liquor, sometimes found a woman singing to the garden of my mind. Just daisies all a bloom while I chewed on my orange rind. You wouldn't forget till you had to ask her.
As a matter of fact, I met a girl whose name was Daisy and this story is told from her perspective. My life became all about her. I made her a Daisy Waters three months later we moved into an apartment building on Delmar owned by a landlady named Mrs. Robinson. More women bosses up here than in the south, but somehow Daisy made everything sweet about that orange rind. She soon quit singing at the Club Fish. I didn't want her there. “Alright Kipster,” she said.
My life as I can Recall for the new Daisy Waters:
I was born in Aberdeen, Mississippi on the 11th day of May, 1915. My mother told me my Uncle Tom said it was way out in the woods. What he called the Byo. They lived on a farm where she cooked for a Captain Henry. There we lived until we were about three years old. I can remember one day a very bad storm came and so goes the story. We moved up to St. Louis, Missouri because it destroyed my home. Now, we're gonna go back and build one. Should have known the storm would have come back. Now, the storm killed my husband Kipster, but I still feel like his soul is with me. The orange rinds keep me going. I chew and I remember just deal with it. Bitterness tastes better, listening to him. “He sees you sometimes, girl,” said his Mama on the phone. He ain't gone.



















A Poem for the end of CHEW THE ORANGE RIND:

LIFE AFTER DEATH: A SPEECH BY THE MAIN CHARACTER:

Diamonds glisten in the moonlight shine
I adore the fire of jade inclined
to give me another golden pearl
of starry silvery messages
rubies of knowledge
the jewel of the day soon ran upon us
that is what life really dazzles
the sun the jewel of day
I could never razzle
It is a jewel day
Let them enter the site
they want to lick the tight
they cannot see why it's fRight
given?
give in, do whatever gives us
it's what we want for thick
give us this
now who cares?
rings, of sex-gender
then, them, let
get, see all
pull it!
OUR SHOES ARE GREAT!
TING, TING THE TOES GO IN,
BANDS ARE PLAYIN',
THOSE HEELS ARE PAININ',
WHAT? HEELS FOR MEN YOU MIGHT?
OH HECK THE WHITE IS LIGHT,
I CAN'T BELIEVE WHAT THE HAIR IT IS,
THEY JUST DON'T LIKE US TO PRETEND THIS,
WELL SHOES: NEWS,
IT TELLS A STORY
WHAT'S YOURS?
OURS IS HISTORY
Publish rubbish?
Ask me easy.
a sneeze at the formality
a wrong right
a question in might
What are they going to want?
That's All They Is Goin' To Want.
Feeling unwrapped in your vows,
undoing every letter,
it will seem to float every rush,
never go out and away from attachment,
seeing how we're bent into shapes,
of circles and squares, diamonds compressed,
let's mesh, let's marry these vows,
how? you ask?
just deliver some food,
straight from the cows

Feeling unwrapped in your vows,
undoing every letter,
it will seem to float every rush,
never go out and away from attachment,
seeing how we're bent into shapes,
of circles and squares, diamonds compressed,
let's mesh, let's marry these vows,
how? you ask?
just deliver some food,
straight from the cows
Let them enter the site
they want to lick the tight
they cannot see why it's fRight
given?
give in, do whatever gives us
it's what we want for thick
give us this
now who cares?
rings, of sex-gender
then, them, let
get, see all
pull it!
They hate to keep telling you,
they hate to keep being here,
they hate what they are,
they hate why they're here,
they hate anything about you,
they hate why,
Now, that they have said that,
CAre! Just care! Please Care!
It's all they want!
please put the haunt of life behind you,
look in front,
look out there,
there's flowers of red,
the're dying from living,
Live, cAre, die, so there,
It's easy as squeezing an orange,
as a bright, brisk sunny day walk,
as a dog's lick,
as a stomp on the ground,
jump up and down,
let out a loud woman hoorah!
We are not blah, dear friend!
Dear friend, we are all we are!
We are beautiful!
meant to be cool,
honestly, never care,
love is there,
the devil is in the details,
but the clouds are in the sky,
look up, make things on the by and by,
why?
Just do,
That's it,
We are just sorry,
to all that we have to worry,
says anything bad in your heart,
please keep yours like a dart,
piercing through the air, sharp,
and with care, stabbing the board,
Forward, with care!
Harsh! harsh! harsh!
I see perfect! Beautiful! Care!
Trust me, this is what you are, dear friend!
What's up! Actually!
Goodbye,
Hello to caring,
What's up! Gosh! We just don't care!
nice philosophy to bear!
We really will never stop doin' it for 'em
It's all we wanna say we are
we don't care less anywhere else
we will be for 'em
Jus' for 'em
Shake it down, rub the scrub
We don't care there
we have here
let's hide until they don't dare
we will copy until we mend
bridges! bridges! bridges!
but all round abound
air, for hair our guts
are in Italy for ourselves
It is not here
It is here
We went up there
so there
There are so many of us
so there
There's nothing you can do
so there
Is it so partner?
so there
where's the care
just care
cannot do so
we are just soul
Picky, prickly roses fall upon your hardness
I long for short, long hair upon your grease
black nights, white days, upon my shadow
of my riches in glory
I cannot seem to fight the end of this story
My might, my strength is footed well upon your climb
I rebut any negative
I reboot any plush pillows of settling upon your year
This will be forever pictured, lips puff like the pillows
It's what I settle upon, The spit, the slime of understanding love
It can never be gross
It is as sterling as silver
as gold as sterling
silver and gold
bold
Behold a stomach of pleasure
muscles of bumps, never a rough
but a tough
and rubber
we will flounder
children will blunder
It is asunder
our thunder
Silver and gold
Sterling to say the least
sterling silver
unleashes the beast of old
gold, new gold, find it
to hold
I'm hungry, I'm hungry
what can I do when I'm hungry?
What do you need?
Let's go out there and see if there's som'm
C'mon let's go back in
I'll sit at the front of the table, Sue
It can't be,
I don't see you
C'mon baby,
be sweet
I cannot see you,
thank you, 'ew
I can eat the sticks
I can eat the sausage
Who's gonna sit there?
I don't know
well you sit there
I'll just go
Do you toast them in the toaster?
He left mama
O'l angry man, you sit in the front, man
why mama?
Where's the syrup Dan?
Just do it, he's gon' back to 'Bama
Running in the wild,


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